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AQA Feedback

by Headstart School in Education Comments: 0 tags: Education

Alongside outstanding exam results this year we have received extremely positive feedback from the AQA Internally Assessed work moderator for English. He states:

‘The moderator would like to congratulate the centre on the way it has engaged with the specification and on the manner in which it has administered the course; deadlines were pre-emptively met and centre mark forms were filled in helpfully and accurately. The centre should be praised for the effort it put into engaging the candidates; clearly they enjoyed aspects of the controlled assessments – specifically the creative writing tasks exploring TV adverts. The centre clearly worked hard to prepare the candidates for their controlled assessments. It was a pleasure to read such well-prepared work from candidates who are clearly motivated to achieve. The English Department should be commended for its endeavours in the study of English language.’

Exam Results


Headstart School rejoices in exam results August 2014.

Our two students who sat GCSE’s this year celebrated outstanding successes with their GCSE results on Thursday 21 August. One student remained with the school an additional year to re-sit GCSE’s – English D, Maths C – both improved by 2 GCSE grades in one year. Our other student obtained English D and Maths F – this exceeded expectation giving us 100% pass rate.

A number of students from Year 9 upwards were successful with entry level qualifications where they were assessed through a combination of coursework, controlled assessment and examinations, depending on the qualification. We are delighted to announce that three students achieved Entry Level 3 Maths (the highest award for this suite of qualifications), two students achieved Entry Level 2 in Maths with a further student gaining an Entry Level 2 in Science.

We congratulate staff and students who have worked so hard and their successes are well deserved. Headstart School continues to go from strength to strength and we are so pleased that our achievements have been rewarded.

 

albert-einstein

 

 

Reflections on 2013 – 2014


Choosing the school at which our children are to be educated is one of the most important decisions we make. One of our strengths is that we are a small school and as a result we are able to offer a high level of care and individual support for every student in a close ‘family’ atmosphere. Our aim is to ensure that each individual student is given every opportunity to reach their full potential. We pride ourselves in offering high quality education in a productive and caring environment. A firm foundation for our success is the good relationship between the school, parents and partners in the local community.

This year we were visited by Ofsted Inspectors who spent two days examining all aspects of school life. We were incredibly pleased with the extremely positive report we received under the new inspection framework which graded us as good in all sections and a good school overall. There were so many fantastic comments about all aspects of our school and I was very pleased that many of them linked directly to our school vision and values. However, despite this report we are not complacent and we will continue to look for ways to improve our school and build on the broad education we offer to all students.

This year has seen a number of changes to staffing, school structure, assessment and curriculum. We realise that the school has been driving forward to raise standards however feel that at the very heart of our beliefs are wishing to raise life chances and aspirations of all young people. In doing so throughout the holidays we are converting an area of the school into a therapy base with a sensory room, soft play room and sensory circuits room, additionally there will be a reading corner where Lennon (the dog) will be based. Works are currently underway in the bottom field to secure areas for chicken, ducks, small animals such as rabbits/guinea pigs etc. Also, lambing pens, holding bays and much more. We have developed the primary, key stage 3, 4 and ASDCN areas throughout the year with more developments planned for the holidays such as soft lighting in the blue rooms. The construction workshop has been resited and is developing. Hopefully you will have all received information regarding the use of Lexia and Symphony and encourage students to use these programmes across the summer to further develop their literacy and numeracy skills.

Stages in Chick Embryo Development

by Headstart School in Life at Headstart Comments: 0

One of the greatest miracles of nature is the transformation of the egg into the chick. A chick emerges after a brief three weeks of incubation. The complexity of the development cannot be understood without training in embryology.

chick-embryo-development-1chick-embryo-development-2

 

 

 

When the egg is laid, some embryonic development has occurred and usually stops until proper cell environmental conditions are established for incubation to resume. At first, all the cells are alike, but as the embryo develops, cell differences are observed. Some cells may become vital organs; others become a wing or leg.

 

Soon after incubation begins, a pointed thickened layer of cells becomes visible in the caudal or tail end of the embryo. This pointed area is the primitive streak, and is the longitudinal axis of the embryo. From the primitive streak, the head and backbone of the embryo develop. A precursor of the digestive tract forms; blood islands appear and will develop later into the vascular or blood system; and the eye begins.

 

On the second day of incubation, the blood islands begin linking and form a vascular system, while the heart is being formed elsewhere.

 

By the 44th hour of incubation, the heart and vascular systems join, and the heart begins beating. Two distinct circulatory systems are established, an embryonic system for the embryo and a vitelline system extending into the egg.

 

At the end of the third day of incubation, the beak begins developing and limb buds for the wings and legs are seen. Torsion and flexion continue through the fourth day. The chick’s entire body turns 90o and lies down with its left side on the yolk. The head and tail come close together so the embryo forms a “C” shape. The mouth, tongue, and nasal pits develop as parts of the digestive and respiratory systems. The heart continues to enlarge even though it has not been enclosed within the body. It is seen beating if the egg is opened carefully. The other internal organs continue to develop. By the end of the fourth day of incubation, the embryo has all organs needed to sustain life after hatching, and most of the embryo’s parts can be identified. The chick embryo cannot, however, be distinguished from that of mammals.

 

The embryo grows and develops rapidly. By the seventh day, digits appear on the wings and feet, the heart is completely enclosed in the thoracic cavity, and the embryo looks more like a bird. After the tenth day of incubation, feathers and feather tracts are visible, and the beak hardens. On the fourteenth day, the claws are forming and the embryo is moving into position for hatching. After twenty days, the chick is in the hatching position, the beak has pierced the air cell, and pulmonary respiration has begun.

 

After 21 days of incubation, the chick finally begins its escape from the shell. The chick begins by pushing its beak through the air cell. The allantois, which has served as its lungs, begins to dry up as the chick uses its own lungs. The chick continues to push its head outward. The sharp horny structure on the upper beak (egg tooth) and the muscle on the back of the neck help cut the shell. The chick rests, changes position, and keeps cutting until its head falls free of the opened shell. It then kicks free of the bottom portion of the shell. The chick is exhausted and rests while the navel openings heal and its down dries. Gradually, it regains strength and walks. The incubation and hatching is complete. The horny cap will fall off the beak within days after the chick hatches.